Climbing-Related Things I Have Bookmarked In The Last Year [An Exhaustive List]

In case you’ve already read all the books you got for the holidays….

Climbing Community/Culture/Meta

  1. Women, First Ascents, and Competition, Article by Thomasina Pidgeon [Gripped] 
  2. LT11’s Jordan Shipman on Vision and the Lack Therof in the Climbing Industry [LT11]
  3. Ten Top Tips for Staying Alive [UKClimbing]
  4. Collette McInerney on Women Sending Hard [Five Ten]
  5. Sonnie Trotter on Dave Graham’s Secret and Hard Climbing [Sonnie Trotter]
  6. NYT Profile of Ashima Shiraishi [New York Times]
  7. It’s Not Cool to Care [The Stone Mind]
  8. Spiral of Death [Rock and Ice]
  9. Women and Development [B3 Bouldering]
  10. Climbing is (Not) the Best [The Stone Mind]
  11. Exorcising Dirtbags: Let the Right One In [Climbing Magazine]
  12. Return To Sender: Writeup of Sender Films [NatGeo]

Long Term Road Trips

  1. Getting Out of the Midwest, Trip Budgeting [MP]
  2. Western U.S. Road Trip, Planning Details and Destination Recommendations [MP]
  3. How To Budget for a Climbing Road Trip [Roll Global]
  4. Guide to Safely Sleeping In Your Vehicle for Free [Roll Global]
  5. 9 Traits of the Ideal Road Trip Companion [semi-rad]
  6. Hobobo Guide to Free Wifi [Roll Global]
  7. Steph Davis on Living in Your Car, Safety Issues [High Infatuation]
  8. Steph Davis on Food on the Road [High Infatuation]
  9. Steph Davis on Where to Sleep While Dirtbagging [High Infatuation]
  10. Steph Davis on How to Set Up Your Truck i.e. the Shelf! [High Infatuation]
  11. Simple Living Manifesto [72 Days Project]
  12. Making Your Road Trip 40% Better [semi-rad]
  13. The Ultimate Road Trip [semi-rad]
  14. Interactive Map: Breweries of the United States [Pop Chart Lab]
  15. Active Fire Mapping Program [US Forest Service]

Lifestyle/Road Trip Blogs 

  1. Mike D’s Climbing Roadtrip Blog
  2. Furgonetten
  3. Peder and Jess
  4. Dirtbag Life

Interviews 

  1. Really Great Interview with Alex Johnson [DPM]
  2. Interview with Collette McInerney on Bolting and Climbing Hard [Climb Find]
  3. Zen Quotes from Chris Sharma [Climb and More]
  4. Interview with Chris Sharma in Ceuse [Petzl]
  5. Chris Sharma Interview [UKClimbing]

Mental Aspects of Climbing

  1. Fear of Falling – Article Explaining Clip Drop Training Technique [UKClimbing]
  2. Attitude and Climbing [MP]
  3. The Rotpunkt Method [The Stone Mind]
  4. Escaping Climbing Grades [Alli Rainey]
  5. Escaping Grade Imprisonment [Alli Rainey]
  6. Mental States, Peak Performance, and Big Dreams [Alli Rainey]

Training for Climbing

  1. Climbing and Training for a Half-Marathon [MP]
  2. Exhaustive Collection of Mostly Horst-Authored Training Articles [Nicros]
  3. Upper Body Strength+Power in Climbing & Training [Alli Rainey]
  4. Hangboard Training with Ryan Palo [Metolius]
  5. Sport Climbing Training Plan, Discussion [MP]
  6. How Do I Get Better Faster? [Power Company Climbing]
  7. How to Climb Harder than Other Newbs [Power Company Climbing]
  8. Relationship Between Lock-Off Ability and Performance [Eva Lopez]
  9. Training Tuesdays: Training Program [Climb On, Sister!]
  10. Training for the Red River Gorge [MP]
  11. Pushing Through Plateaus [Alli Rainey]
  12. How I Broke Through My Biggest Climbing Plateau [The Morning Fresh]
  13. One Workout Every Climber Should Do [DPM]
  14. Training Wonks Discuss Training [MP]
  15. Spice Up Your ARC Training [Lazy H Climbing Club]
  16. Training Obsession [Will Gadd]
  17. H.I.T. Training [Cragmama]
  18. Article about Professional Climbing Coaching for Adults [Climber Magazine]

Climbing Videos 

  1. Tomorrow I Will Be Gone, Bouldering in Rocklands [Outcrop Films]   
  2. Zombie Roof Solo [Will Stanhope, filmed by Dave Pearson]
  3. Red River Gorge: Gray’s Branch [Colin Delhanty]
  4. Cell Block Six [Sean Stewart]
  5. Protips 3 Jason Kehl [Climb X Media]
  6. Protips 6 Lauren Lee [Climb X Media] 
  7. Protips Slopers [Climb X Media]
  8. Climb Like Sharma [Rock and Ice]
  9. Demon Seed [Sean Stewart]

Destination Specific Links 

  1. Ten Sleep, Wyoming [Roll Global]
  2. Ten Sleep Canyon Camping Options [MP]
  3. Climbing on Cayman Brac [JB]
  4. Fired For Sandbagging route page [MP]

Gear

  1. Blank Slate Page Where You Can Buy the Ten  Sleep Guidebook [Blank Slate]
  2. What to Put in the Ultimate Back Country First Aid Kit [Roll Global]
  3. 12 Reasons the iPhone is an Awesome Piece of Climbing Gear [Adventure Journal]
  4. 10 Cheap Substitutes for Expensive Camping Gear [Adventure Journal]
  5. Bliss Wrap [Icebreaker]
  6. Foam Mattress Topper [Walmart]

Miscellaneous

  1. Pretty Nice Climbing Photo Which I Bookmarked For Unknown Reasons [tumblr]
  2. Elvis Leg of The Climbing Soul [Tara Reynvaan]
  3. A Zen Story [Stone Mind]
  4. Making a Crimp Mug [?]
  5. Excellent RouteSetting Blog [RouteCrafting] 
  6. Dream World [The Ascent Blog]
  7. Finding the Power of the Unplugged Mind [Proactive Outside]
  8. Physiological Responses to Rock Climbing in Young Climbers [British Journal of Sports Medicine]

Have more links or better links? Did I forget to bookmark something good? Post up in the comments and let us know!

Gift Ideas for the Climber in Your Life

#1 What They Ask For

Relatives and non-climber friends of climbers can have a hard time figuring out what it is you want. A few years ago, my brother walked into a book store and asked for a book about climbing for his sister. He walked out with a copy of 127 hours.

If you do your best on your own, your climber will still love their gift. But climbers are pathological collectors of climbing year. We have a wish list, trust me. We can always think of something we ‘need’ that you can get us! Read on for more ideas for (affordable) gifts for climbers…

#2 Something to Put on Their Hands  

For a detailed and hilarious overview of “crap climbers put on their hands”, check out this post over at The Stone Mind. Despite carrying it around with me everywhere, I never lost my little tin of Skin Doctor while I was on the road this summer. It was too precious to lose! The Climb On! products also get rave reviews from climbers I know.

Climb On! Lotion bar. Also comes as a creme, and (newly) with a manly scent!

#3 A Bail ‘Biner

This suggestion was inspired by my lucky bail ‘biner. It was one of the first pieces of gear I ever owned. Whenever this bail ‘biner went up a hard route on someone’s harness, the route got finished, and the ‘biner came back down. Once I noticed, I started taking it with me for a little bit of extra confidence.

Get your favorite climbing partner a lucky bail ‘biner of their very own for the new year. Write them a note. Tell them about the mystic powers of the lucky bail ‘biner, and remind them to dream big and try hard in the new year. If the ‘biner eventually gets left behind, its newness and shininess will make someone’s day.

From Trango, the Superfly. Your favorite climbing partner could be super fly too!

From Trango, the Superfly. Your favorite climbing partner could be super fly too!

#4 Really Fancy Socks

This suggestion came from one of my followers on twitter, @climbing_strong. Having the right thing in between your shoes and your feet can make a world of difference in comfort when you’re out tramping. Even better, sock sizes are easier to guess correctly than other clothing sizes. In my opinion, you can’t go wrong with a merino wool, but some folks are fond of synthetic technical fabrics as well.

socks

I love all things colorful, and Icebreaker doesn’t disappoint. Their apparel is a bit pricey, but the performance you get is worth every penny.

#5 Reel Rock 7

Nothing says “I love you, man” like giving your buddy climbing porn for the holidays. This year’s Reel Rock is now on sale at www.reelrocktour.com. I think it’s worthwhile to support the folks that are producing top-notch climbing media. Reel Rock is consistently entertaining and high quality. This year’s films are no exception.

#6 Rope Wash

The year after I found 127 Hours under the tree, my family upped their game and bought me rope wash. On their own. Despite knowing barely anything about climbing. I was surprised and touched.

The question of whether washing ropes actually does anything has been debated endlessly on the internet, and eventually boils down to personal preference. Several different washes are available, but I’m inclined to trust something from a rope manufacturer over and independent product. Follow these tips from Splitter Choss if you end up putting your rope wash to use!

Sterling’s Wicked Good Rope Wash

#7 A Petzl Draw

Tried and true, these draws are beloved by climbers the world over. They can be a bit pricey, so most climbers I know acquire them slowly, a few at a time. Help your favorite climber out by adding a few to their collection.

petzl

Big beefy dogbones make great emergency nylon jugs when you’re trying hard at your limit.

#8 Your Suggestions

What did I leave off? Leave a comment to let me know!

[Dear Beloved Family, Please refer to #1, then talk to Mom. :)]

Rest to Send

It’s almost Thanksgiving! As the race to finish up projects before the season ends begins, check out these tips for resting on routes and then go out and crush!

Rest When You Don’t Feel Tired

Some routes have a relatively easy section of climbing, followed by a bomber rest, followed by the ‘real’ business. These routes can be hard to rest on–you’re not tired yet, you’re anxious about the rest of the route, and it feels silly to be sitting around. I have two strategies for these sort of rests. Sometimes I’ll visualize climbing the rest of the route, reviewing beta, creating a positive vision for how the rest of the climb is going to go. Sometimes this will just make me nervous and shaky, so I’ll just focus on breathing and slowing my heart down. Do what works for you, but always take full advantage of any rest you get.

Shake the Kneebar!

Often when you’re resting, you’re recovering in your forearms at the expense of pumping out some random part of your body, like your calves. While I was working 49 in Maple, a friend of mine sent the route. When he got to the kneebar rest before the tough (for me) clip, he set the kneebar, rested, came back onto his arms, shook his calf, and stuck the kneebar right back in to rest some more. It had never occurred to me to shake anything but my arms at a rest until that day! With the shake-the-kneebar beta, I was able to get something back before the tough clip.

I met Wendy in Maple Canyon, land of the kneebars. I learned a lot about resting from this quiet crusher. Here she is cruising 49.

Be Patient

I habitually wear a watch, and I’ve started using it to time my rests. Sometimes it will feel like I’ve rested forever and I’ll look down to see that only 15 seconds have passed. At a no-hands rest, I will hang out as long as 2 or 3 minutes to make sure that I’ve completely recovered. At less-awesome rests, I still try to stay at least a minute. Note: this tip probably won’t work for crack climbers, unless you can find somewhere else to put the watch! ;)

Communicate

Let your belayer know you’ll be resting. Also make sure to communicate clearly and confidently that you are climbing when you exit the rest. You won’t take your belayer by surprise, and you can climb on with confidence, knowing that your belayer is with you.

Listen to Your Heart

Sometimes, a rest is not as good as you want it to be. It feels like you’re not getting anything back, you’re stressing out about the moves above you, and all of the sudden it feels like it would be better to just GO already. Don’t give into temptation! If a rest is only slightly decreasing or even just maintaining your pump, it’s still worth it to rest, because you can drop your heart rate back down and establish a good breathing rhythm. This will help you move better after the rest, even if it doesn’t feel like it while you’re resting.

Practice It!

Incorporate resting into your practice or training in the gym. If you do endurance training like ARCing, you are probably taking a few seconds to shake on jugs every once in a while. Challenge yourself to make good use of less-good rests. If you’re on a good jug, try smearing one or both feet. Use a higher foot than is really comfortable, or use a sideways facing jug instead of an upwards facing one. Teach yourself to relax and get something back even in slightly uncomfortable positions.
What are you trying to send this fall? Let us know in the comments and tell us how it goes!!

how to be a dirtbag climber girl

Someone found my blog by searching the title of this post. I can’t seem to replicate it (maybe the all-knowing google knows that I know where my blog is?), but I thought I’d answer the question anyway.

My most important advice is to be confident, and do it your way.

This is also known as the fake-it-till-you-make-it principle. If you’re a girl considering a dirtbag lifestyle and hesitating, don’t! Just go do it! Before my trip this summer I worried a lot about not climbing hard enough to make it on the road, not knowing enough climbers to make it work, and a lot of other silly things. None of these worries are important. I have never talked to anyone who regretted living on the road for a while.

I know so many people who hit the road, found community, and never looked back. It will work for you too. Sell your shit. Quit your job. End your lease. Hit the road! Or don’t listen to me and do it your way. That’s even better.

Go find the wild places, because they’re there. Mt. Fitz Roy in Argentina by flickr user StuckInCustoms

A bunch of my practical advice for dirtbag livin’ is on this blog. Check out my post about living in a truck, or the dirtbag beta series for some tips. Steph Davis has a lot of great tips on her blog as well. Wherever you go, you will need to find out where to sleep, where to do laundry/get wifi/get food, and where to get beer. Sometimes this info is easy to find on the internet, sometimes it’s easier to find by word of mouth.

There is only one bit of ‘how to be a dirtbag’ advice that is female-specific (that I can think of).

All climbers should be able to pee standing up without taking off their harnesses. It makes life so much easier! If you weren’t born with the right equipment, you should look into getting a PStyle. They are cheap, easy to clean, and don’t look like funnels. I will never go climbing/camping without mine!

What’s your advice for aspiring dirtbags? Sound off in the comments?

Training Dreams

Today is the day before work starts for me in earnest. Some things are kicking in already, but tomorrow the deluge will begin. I wanted to take a moment to think about my health and my goals for the semester, so I sat down and planned out a training schedule and some training goals.

Those of you that have been around for a while might notice that some of my goals are reprises from last spring–whups.  I am dreaming big and hoping that I’ll have the dedication and determination to stick with this schedule through what I anticipate to be a very busy fall.

Goals: 

  1. Redpoint 111 5.11s and 12 5.12s — I set this goal over the summer, and then realized that it was way too ambitious for the time I had left. It’s probably too ambitious for this season too. I’m keeping it around because I want to be committed to building a base and pushing my limits. I’m hoping to make progress on the totals this fall, but I’m not sure accomplishing this goal is realistic. Current count: 20/111 5.11s, 3/12 5.12s
  2. 20 Days Outside in the Fall — This one is pretty self explanatory. Getting outdoors time is really important for improving, especially for me, as I am still working to address my mental weaknesses. Current progress: 2/20!
  3. 5 Pull-ups in a Set — I set this goal because doing pull-ups makes me feel confident and bad-ass, not because I’m hoping it will improve my climbing. Currently at a 3 rep max.
  4. 10 Push-ups — I still can’t do a real push-up. I got pretty close to doing one normal push-up last spring, then went on the road and promptly stopped training push-ups. This a smaller part of a broader effort to do more opposition muscle work this fall.
  5. Lift Two Days a Week
  6. Redpoint 5.12b — I have about 5 days around Thanksgiving, which is the longest block of outdoor time I’ll be able to get all fall. I’m hoping to have a project in mind by then, and cap off the outdoor season with a win.

In recognition that I’m not going to have as much time as I want, I’m backing off on performance oriented goals, and trying to set goals that will motivate me to get make time for lifting and climbing, and help me stay consistent. What are your big goals this fall? What steps are you going to take to accomplish them?

After the break, I included my training schedule for those of you that are interested. :)

Continue reading

Maple Canyon Dirtbag Beta

Unfortunately folks, my road trip has reached its end. As I get re-acclimated to civilized life, I’ve finished up the last installment (for now) of the dirtbag beta series. You can see my posts on Ten Sleep and Smith here and here.

Where are you going to sleep?

There are two options for camping in Maple Canyon, lettered and numbered sites. Lettered sites are better for dirt bags–unlike numbered sites, they can’t be reserved. If you occupy a lettered site, you can be assured that you won’t have to move camp. Lettered sites cost $3 per night. The other option is to stay in an un-reserved or un-occupied numbered site. There are some perks, like proximity to the right fork and left fork trailheads, and a shorter walk to the bathroom. The numbered sites cost $8 a night, and can be reserved online at www.reserveamerica.com

Rest Day Essentials: Snow College

Snow College in Ephraim, UT, can hook you up with showers and internet on your rest day. Showers, in the Rec Center at 350 East Street, are $2 a person. The ladies’ shower has stalls, the mens’ is locker-room style. An extra $1 gets you access to the pool, gym, and courts at the rec center, in case you feel the need to get your blood moving on a rest day.

The library, located nearby, has free wifi. The study rooms on the 3rd floor have big screens that can be hooked up to your computer for watching movies or tv. If you’re a mac person, you might have to bring your own adapter. As a bonus, the latest issue of Climbing Magazine can be found in the magazine racks on the first floor.

Try not to rest on Sunday! Everything will be closed, and there will be nothing for you to do.

Getting Beer

Due to Utah’s 3.2% Law, getting decent beer can be a bit complicated.

Option 1: Bring it with you. This is the best option.

If Option 1 doesn’t work out, because you didn’t plan ahead, or because you drank all your beer too fast, there’s always…

Option 2: Go to a state liquor store. If you are really a beer snob, you might have to go all the way to Provo to find microbrews that pass muster.  I have been to the state liquor store in Ephraim, and was not impressed with the selection, but the selection in Mt. Pleasant or Nephi might be better.

Rest Day Paradise: RV Park in Manti

I have heard that for $4, you can get a shower, sit in a hot tub, surf the internet, and swim in the pool! Laundry machines are also available.

Projecting in Maple

Projecting can be a rocky road, especially if the project in question is close to your limit. I’ve been working lately on 49, a 5.12a on the Minimum Wall here in Maple Canyon. It’s a challenging project for me for a number of reasons–it’s long and sustained, it overhangs, and the bolts are well-spaced. I only have a few days left here in the Canyon and on this trip in general–I really want to pull off a win and send before I leave!

On Ground Work, 5.11c at the Minimum. Erik Jenson photo.

It seems like every time I’m on the route, I make a different mistake. I’ve one-hung it four times now, once even while hanging draws. At the end of my last day working the route, with three one-hangs in a day, I felt tired and beaten. I went back to camp and slept for 11 hours straight, and stayed away from the route on my next day climbing.

I’ve noticed a trend in my first go of the day of a route I’ve been working on–I tend to rush my climbing. By the time I pull on, I’ve been thinking about the route since I woke up, sometimes for the whole day before too. I go over key beta in my head, vizualise a successful send, think about why I failed the last few times, and plan how I’m going to do better. This anticipation creates a sense of urgency that causes me to rush my climbing–more than once, it’s caused me to fail on ‘easy’ or ‘wired’ moves. In my hurry to get the crux and do it right, finally, I’ll skip adjusting a foot lower down, or fail to hold enough tension in my body to execute a move.

My goal for tomorrow is to hop on my project relaxed and unhurried. To be patient with myself and with my body, and to give it all I’ve got. Wish me luck! :)